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How to Transform a Kombucha Bottle into Cleaning Sprayer

If you peruse the aisles of any supermarket, it’s likely you’ll discover all kinds of unique glass containers that can be used to make chic home decor or even boutique worthy up-cycled wares that would likely generate a new stream of income. Every time I throw away an empty product container that I know can be used to make something useful and new, I feel a little guilty that I didn’t use it for something creative. My excuse for wasting it is usually a lack of time.  But recently I decided to fight the urge to purge and make something unique and functional.

The best thing about this project is that it took me less than an hour from start to finish.

My container of choice was a glass Kombucha bottle. But you can choose any container that will fit a standard twist-on sprayer top.

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I used a:

  • Glass bottle
  • Dish soap, sponge, and a straight edge to remove adhesive
  • Wire cutter
  • Matching spray bottle top (you can try out sprayers from empty containers around the house to make sure you have a good fit). Or you can buy a sprayer minus the bottle.
  • Vinyl in color of choice. I used Oracal 651 in mat white.
  • Cut file design of choice
  • Cricut Maker or vinyl cutter of choice
  • Computer with Cricut design space installed
  • Contact paper
  • Pair of scissors
  • Cut mat
  • Scraper
  • Tape measurer
  • Weeding tool

I start with an empty Kombucha bottle. I really like the dark bottles. They tend to be a little more durable and they block UV light. Some substances like essential oils tend to degrade when exposed to UV light. So, the kombucha bottle I chose is especially ideal for my homemade glass cleaner since I use a few drops of lavender oil in it.

I use a wire cutter to remove the little ring portion of the cap from around the opening of the bottle. Then I peel away the label. I notice a lot of glue left on the glass so after I remove the lid, I use water, dish soap and an abrasive sponge to scrub it off. I use something will a metal straight edge to scrape any residue off that the sponge didn’t remove.

I measure the width and height of the area where I’d like the label to be on the bottle. My label ends up being around 3”by 2”.

I position a piece of scrap vinyl on my cutting mat and set it up for cutting. I design one label for the front and one or the back and convert it to a cut file. I upload my cut file into Cricut Design Space, then send it to my Cricut Maker to cut.

I use my weeding tool to isolate the design. Weeding can be treacherous if you are not a master. I am no weeding master. So, I had to remember not to make the letters on my label too tiny. (There was that time when they were, and all was lost.)

Once I’m done weeding, I lay the contact paper on top. I use my scraper to make sure the front of the vinyl sticks to it, I remove the vinyl label from its backing, then I position it over my bottle and smooth it down. I repeat this with the design for the opposite side of the bottle.

Finally, I twist on a spray cap, and I’m done.

You can use your up-cycled spray bottles for just about any liquid product, but you don’t have to stop with a spray nozzle. You can match up a pump-style top and brand other homemade concoctions like lotions, shampoos, conditioners, and ointments. The possibilities are bountiful!